What is family-centred practice?

A visual representation

The diagrams below are the brainchild of the COPMI TheMHS workshop committee, and were conceived as a visual representation of what we mean when we talk about family-centred services. The diagrams were created by Genevieve Flynn, a young designer, then revised based on feedback from the workshop participants.

What do you think?

We invite you to use these diagrams to reflect on family-centred practice, and what it means for your workplace, or your family. You are welcome to use the diagrams to start conversations with family members, with your team at work, or with other colleagues. Or you could use them in presentations about family-centred practice. Click on each of the diagrams to access and download a high resolution jpeg file.

If you do you use our diagrams please display them with their accompanying text and credit the COPMI national initiative as the copyright owner.

Family-centred practice means…

Services which are built from the ground up by people with mental illness and their families, including children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Family-centred practice means…

Professionals who understand that people with mental illness are part of diverse families, which may include children, and who use that understanding to guide everything they do.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family-centred practice means…

People with mental illness and their families working together in partnership with professionals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family-centred practice means…

Systems based on a paradigm which puts the needs, participation and leadership of families at the forefront of planning, communication, values and practice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family-centred practice means…

Research with and by people with mental illness and their families to inform evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family-centred practice…

Contrasts with service-centred approaches which do not place people with mental illness and their families at the core of their organisation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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